Monthly Archives: August 2021

Quick and Easy (and not the best) way to use HTTPS with qBittorrent and Firefox

Wanna use HTTPS with your qBittorrent WebUI, but don’t know how? First off, you probably shouldn’t expose the qBittorrent WebUI to the internet. Use Wireguard to tunnel into your home network, and access it that way. Some will say you don’t need HTTPS then, but that is a discussion for another day. Anyway, if you want easy HTTPS with qBittorrent, read on.

From a Linux CLI, run the following command. This will create a cert.pem file and a key.pem file.

openssl req -x509 -newkey rsa:4096 -nodes -out cert.pem -keyout key.pem -days 365

Now, we need to add these to the WebUI. In qBittorrent, go into options > Web UI. Check use HTTPS instead of HTTP. Then, enter the paths to the certificate and the key that you just created.

Choose Use HTTPS instead of HTTP

Now you need to add an exception in your browser. This will bypass the warning message that you’ll get that warns you about your cert. You probably shouldn’t do this, but oh well. If the bad guy has gotten this far, your qBittorrent app is probably the least of your worries. After all, they’ve probably already cracked your WebUI password, and can run arbitrary python code, as I talked about here.

Anyway, in Firefox, go to settings > privacy & security. Then scroll down to find certificates where you will see the option to view certificates, so click on that. The certificate manager, as seen below, should pop up. Click on the servers tab, and then click add exception.

add an exception in Firefox

Enter the URL of your qBittorrent WebUI. As you can see, in the picture above, mine is 192.168.1.191:6969. Use your URL in the location box on the add security exception screen. Then click get certification. It’ll query the site for the cert and then the checkbox to permanently store this exception will become clickable. So click there and then click on confirm security exception.

Boom! That’s all you have to do in Firefox. Now you have HTTPS with your qBitorrent WebUI. I’m not going to cover Chrome or Edge, because you should use FOSS (and don’t tell me to use Chromium). Again, this isn’t the best way to do this, but it’ll work. If you want HTTPS with an official certificate, try out Let’s Encrypt.

Evasion Techniques and Breaching Defenses (PEN-300) – OSEP – Initial Thoughts

I just started this course the other day. I’m already neck deep in VBA, C#, and Powershell, which I need more experience in anyway. I had to do some C# for the AWAE/OSWE and I’ve written a couple very small web apps in C#. I’ve done a very minimal amount of Powershell, though I’ve been meaning to change that.

I know a lot of people say the OSCP is lacking in Active Directory attacking, which may be true. I’d counter by saying what the OSCP doesn’t cover, PEN-300 will cover. The courses go hand in hand. My early opinion is that anybody that takes and passes the OSCP should do PEN-300

All in all, I’m pleased so far. I’m only about 1/7th of the way through the PDF, though. I have a lot to go. With all that I have going on IRL, I’m not sure I’ll be able to finish it in the two months I’m allotted – I may have to get an extension.

My plan is to pass the OSEP exam in October and then start the EXP-301 course and pass that exam by the end of the year. This is an aggressive, and probably unrealistic goal, but oh well, haha.

Anyway, I’ll be back with a full report after the exam.